Everything to Know About Preventing Arthritis in the Hands (2022)

Arthritis includes several conditions that affect the joints. There are more than 100 types of arthritis. Many different types of arthritis can affect the hands, wrists, and fingers, including osteoarthritis (OA) and inflammatory arthritis types like rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

There’s no cure for arthritis, but there are things you can do to reduce the likelihood of getting arthritis in your hands, preventing arthritis flare-ups, and reducing joint damage.

Causes of Arthritis in the Hands

Arthritic conditions can cause pain, stiffness, swelling, and tenderness in the small joints of the hands and fingers.

Inflammatory arthritis conditions, like RA, psoriatic arthritis, gout, and ankylosing spondylitis cause inflammation. Symptoms of inflammation include redness, warmth, swelling, and pain. In general, OA is degenerative, rather than inflammatory.

Inflammatory Arthritis

Inflammatory arthritis conditions often affect multiple joints in the body and can be systemic, affecting the entire body.RA is the most common type of inflammatory arthritis.

With RA, the synovium, which lines the joints, becomes inflamed. If left untreated, inflammatory arthritis can cause damage to cartilage, bone, tendons, and ligaments, eventually impairing the function of the affected joint.

Is Hand Deformity Inevitable With Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Research shows 90% of people with RA will have some hand involvement, which can cause problems for activities of daily living (ADL).

RA tends to affect the metacarpophalangeal (MCP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP), and thumb interphalangeal (IP) joints.

  • The MCP joint, or the knuckle­, is where the finger joints meet the hand joints. At the MCP, the fingers bend and stretch and help you to pick up and hold on to objects.
  • The PIP joint is the first joint of the finger and is located between the other two bones of the finger. It can bend and extend.
  • The thumb IP joint has two bones, so it is only one joint. It is located at the tip of the finger closest to the fingertip.

With RA, you can experience hand involvement in one or more finger joints in both hands.

When Rheumatoid Arthritis Affects the Wrist

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease in which the cartilage between the joints wears down. Bones will rub together due to diminished cushioning. That rubbing leads to inflammation, stiffness, and pain.

Any joint can be affected by OA, including those in your hands. According to the Arthritis Foundation, about half of all women and one-quarter of men will experience OA in their hands by the time they are 85 years old.

(Video) Arthritis Of The Fingers - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Osteoarthritis in the hands affects the wrists, the DIP joints (at the fingertips), the PIP joints, and the basial joint (connecting the thumb and wrist).

In OA, bony nodules—called Heberden's nodes—can develop between the PIP and DIP joints of the fingers. Nodules at the PIP joint are called Bouchard’s nodes. Hand OA may cause pain, swelling, and a bump in the base of the thumb.

Hand OA may lead to difficulties with hand grip and pinch strength. It can cause pain with tasks that require hand and finger strength, like opening a jar or turning a key.

10 Ways to Naturally Manage Arthritis in the Hands

Preventing Arthritis in Your Hands

Some risk factors for arthritis are not modifiable—such as aging and family history. But there are also risk factors within your control. You can reduce your risk for arthritis conditions by managing those. You will also want to take preventive measures to reduce the risk of your existing arthritis condition affecting your hands.

Maintaining Good Health

If you have not developed arthritis in your hands, there are some things you can do to prevent damage to the joints of your hands, wrists, and fingers.

Follow Your Arthritis Treatment Plan

Your arthritis treatment plan is vital, especially if you have RA and another type of inflammatory arthritis. One of the main goals of an RA treatment plan is to maintain joint function, including and especially of the joints of your hands.

Make sure you take the medications your practitioner prescribes and follow all the instructions you have been given.Many of these medicines decrease inflammation and prevent damage throughout the body, including the hands, wrists, and fingers.

See Your Healthcare Provider Regularly

Make sure you keep your appointments and see your healthcare provider regularly. Talk to your practitioner about any changes in hand symptoms and joint function.

Let your healthcare provider know about any swelling, stiffness, or pain in your hands and if you experience function difficulties, such as with turning doorknobs, opening jars, or gripping objects.

Don't Smoke

Smoking can increase your risk for RA, and it makes the disease worse for people who already have RA. Research also connects smoking to OA of the hands, knees, hips, and spine. If you are a smoker, you should quit right away to reduce your risk for both OA and RA.

(Video) Stop Arthritis Pain - Arthritis in Hands and Wrists - Ask Dr. Abelson

Eat a Healthy Diet

The Arthritis Foundation recommends eating a “diet rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, nuts and beans, and low in processed foods and saturated fat” to prevent inflammation and improve joint symptoms.

A Mediterranean diet is a type of anti-inflammatory diet that can help manage inflammation associated with both RA and OA.

Avoiding Injury

Putting stress on the hand joints can cause wear and tear that eventually leads to OA. An injury can damage the cartilage in the joints, and injured joints are more likely to develop arthritis. You may not have symptoms until many years later.

Ways to avoid hand injury include:

  • Hand exercises: Exercising the hands can keep joints, ligaments, and tendons flexible and increase synovial fluid.
  • Protection when playing sports: Hand and wrist injuries are common in sports, including basketball, tennis, and baseball. Protective equipment may help prevent injuries.
  • Practicing job safety: If your job requires pushing, pulling, and lifting, you should take precautions to avoid joint injury. Make sure you are using appropriate safety equipment, using tools correctly, and practicing lifting safely. Avoiding lifting heavy items and any lifting that puts a strain on hands and fingers.
  • Practicing good ergonomics: Computer jobs can also put a strain on your hand and finger joints. You can reduce some of this by using an ergonomic keyboard and mouse. Consider trying dictation software to reduce the constant work of your hands.
  • Splinting and bracing: Make use of splints and braces to reduce injury when doing repetitive hand activities or if you are experiencing pain and inflammation in your hand, finger, or wrist joints.

When to See a Healthcare Provider

Some telltale signs that arthritis has affected your hands include swelling, stiffness, tenderness, and joint pain of your wrists, hands, and fingers.

You should see a healthcare provider when:

  • Home treatments aren’t helping. If you have tried ice, heat therapy, over-the-counter pain (OTC) relievers, and rest without adequate relief, it is a good idea to make an appointment with your practitioner to determine the source of your hand symptoms.
  • You have pain in multiple joints. Conditions like RA make several of your joints hurts. So, if you are experiencing pain in other joints, in addition to your hands, it is a good idea to call your healthcare provider and get in for an appointment.
  • Your hand joints hurt a lot. If you have severe hand, finger, or wrist pain, this is another reason to call your practitioner.
  • You have warmth and redness. Symptoms like redness and warmth are signs of inflammation in the joints and need to be checked out.
  • You have gradual pain and stiffness. Any type of joint pain—whether in your hands or elsewhere in your body—that progresses slowly could be linked to an underlying medical illness

Preventing Flare-Ups

An arthritis flare-up (also called a flare) is a sudden increase in joint pain, swelling, stiffness, and tenderness. In addition to joint symptoms, flares may also cause severe fatigue and a general unwell feeling.

Because flares are never pleasant or easy, you will need to do what you can to prevent them by avoiding triggers that cause flares. Triggers can involve overdoing activities, stress, and not eating healthy.

Medications

The single most important thing you can do to prevent flare-ups is to take your arthritis medications on time and correctly. Try not to skip doses—use a timer, pillbox, or another method to help you stay on track.

Call your healthcare provider if you think you might feel a flare starting. They might be able to adjust your treatment plan to get symptoms managed.

Anti-inflammatory medications are commonly recommended for managing inflammation caused by arthritic conditions, including OA and RA. There are two main types of anti-inflammatory medicines: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids.

NSAIDs

(Video) Hand Arthritis Stretches & Exercises - Ask Doctor Jo

NSAIDs like ibuprofen, aspirin, and naproxen are available without a prescription. However, your practitioner can prescribe stronger versions if they feel you need them to better manage inflammation and pain.

Corticosteroids

Sometimes called steroids, corticosteroids are man-made drugs that resemble a hormone called cortisol that is naturally produced in the adrenal glands. They are available in pill form, as an injection, and as topical pain relievers.

Corticosteroids work by decreasing inflammation throughout the body, which can reduce joint pain, stiffness, swelling, and tenderness of the joints.Corticosteroids need to be prescribed by your healthcare provider, although some over-the-counter topical pain relievers contain low amounts.

Diet

There is no clear evidence that diet can improve arthritis symptoms. But many people with arthritis say they feel better when they cut out certain foods. Foods considered inflammatory include processed and fast foods, red meats, and sugary desserts.

An anti-inflammatory diet might help reduce inflammation and improve symptoms of arthritis. Foods considered anti-inflammatory include oily fish, fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts and seeds, olive oil, some spices (like ginger and turmeric), and probiotics and prebiotics.

Hand Exercises

Hand, wrist, and finger pain can be frustrating and make it harder to perform basic tasks, including using a computer, preparing meals, getting dressed, and cleaning your home. Hand exercises can help improve hand function and are easy to do.

Here are five hand exercises recommended by Havard Medical School. Start these exercises slowly and ease off if you experience pain. For each exercise, hold the position for 5–10 seconds. Do each set 10 times, three times per day.

  1. Wrist extension and flexion: Place your forearm on a flat surface on a rolled-up towel with your palm down, hanging at the edge of the table. Move the hand upward until you feel the stretch. Return to the starting position and repeat the same motions with the elbow bent at your side, palm up.
  2. Wrist supination/pronation: Standing or sitting with your arm at your side, elbow bent at 90 degrees and palm facing down, rotate the forearm so the palm faces up and then down.
  3. Wrist ulnar/radial deviation: Start by supporting your forearm on a table with a rolled-up towel for padding, thumb upward. As an alternative, you can use your knee for support. To do the exercise, move the wrist up and then down through its full range of motion.
  4. Thumb flexion/extension: Start with your thumb in an outward position. Then move the thumb across your palm and back to the start position.
  5. Hand/finger tendon glide: Start this exercise with your fingers extended straight out. Then, make a hook fist, hold for 5–10 seconds, and then return to a straight hand. Next, make a full fist, hold it for 5–10 seconds, and return to a straight hand. Last, make a straight fist, hold for 5–10 seconds, and then return to a straight hand.

Supportive Devices

Supportive devices, including hand splints and compression gloves, can position joints to reduce pain and extend your range of motion.

Hand Splints

Different types of hand splints and finger splints can be worn to reduce pain and support your hand during tasks that require you to use your hands, wrists, and fingers.

One study reported in 2014 found short-term, nighttime use of splinting of the DIP joint was a safe and simple way to reduce pain and improve mobility in the joint.

A newer study—this one reported in 2018—found that splinting could manage hand and wrist function in people who experience RA of their hands. Researchers found that hand and wrist stabilization helped with improving function, grip, and manual dexterity.

Compression Gloves

Compression gloves can be an alternative to hand splints, or they can be used at night after splints have been removed. These tight-fitting and flexible gloves can reduce hand pain and stiffness and improve hand function.

(Video) 3 Tips to Decrease Finger Arthritis Pain

Compression gloves are safe and commonly used. However, there is little research that confirms compression gloves can be effective.

Stress Management

Reducing stress can help prevent flares, manage arthritis, and reduce the length of flares. People with arthritis can make use of any number of stress relief activities to keep arthritis symptoms at bay.

Stress relief techniques include:

  • Meditation
  • Deep, relaxation breathing
  • Mind-body exercises like yoga and tai chi
  • Journaling
  • Practicing gratitude

If you find that stress relief activities are not helping or you are struggling to cope with the challenges of arthritis, ask your healthcare provider for a recommendation to a mental health therapist who can be a resource for finding ways to better cope.

A Word From Verywell

The outlook for most people with hand arthritis is good. If you are at risk of hand arthritis, pay attention to preventative strategies so you can reduce the likelihood of developing it.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What causes arthritis flare-ups?

    The cause of arthritis flare-ups can differ with each type of disease, but near-universally, flares are more likely when a person has a lapse in their medication. In rheumatoid arthritis, flares can be triggered by stress, poor sleep, overexertion, and infection. Psoriatic arthritis flares are caused by stress, skin injury, certain medications, strep throat, allergies, and more. When flares repeatedly occur, it may help to speak to a doctor to adjust your treatment plan.

  • What are the first signs of arthritis in hands?

    The first sign of arthritis in the hand is often a dull or burning pain. This can appear soon after the hand's joints have been subject to heavy use, such as when tightly gripping an object. This pain can sometimes be delayed by hours or may not appear until the next day. Reporting early symptoms of arthritis to a doctor as soon as possible can make treatment more effective.

  • Can you get gout in your hands?

    (Video) 7 Tips to Reduce Hand Arthritis Pain (Physical Therapy Approved)

    Yes, you can get gout in your hands. Gout is a type of arthritis that causes crystals made from uric acid to form in the joints, resulting in swelling, redness, and pain. The risk of gout increases when the body cannot get rid of uric acid fast enough. Additionally, it can affect any joint. Gout treatment often relies on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) medication.

FAQs

What can I do to prevent arthritis in my hands? ›

Moving your hands and fingers can help keep your ligaments and tendons flexible and increase the function of synovial fluid. Try regular hand exercises to strengthen muscles and relieve stiffness and pain. Simple exercises like flexing and bending, finger touching, and finger sliding may help keep your fingers limber.

How can I prevent arthritis in my hands from getting worse? ›

A complete treatment plan for arthritis of the hand includes these additional approaches:
  1. Exercises — strengthening and stretching — to reduce symptoms and improve function. ...
  2. Hot and cold packs. ...
  3. Rest. ...
  4. Healthy eating and managing diabetes and cholesterol.
  5. Weight loss if you're overweight.
  6. Smoking cessation.
6 Jul 2021

How do I stop my fingers from deforming with arthritis? ›

Ring splints can be worn on any finger to help these problems and other deformities, such as joints that become “stuck” in a hyperextended position or instability at the knuckles from conditions like Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, where fingers may cross under or over each other.

Can arthritis be reversed in hands? ›

There is no known cure for arthritis, which commonly affects the hands. However, a person can take steps to lower the risk of arthritis developing or worsening and to reduce and manage pain. These steps include practicing specific exercises and making dietary changes and adjustments to daily habits.

What is the best product to use for arthritis in your hands? ›

Products that contain nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) work best. A topical NSAID ointment works directly to decrease arthritis swelling that causes joint pain. NSAIDs are the class of pain reliever that includes Advil (ibuprofen).

What exercises can I do to get rid of arthritis in my fingers? ›

Hold your hand out with fingers straight, palm down. Slowly bend your hand into a loose fist (don't squeeze), with your thumb on the outside. Re-open your hand, stretching your fingers straight. Repeat 10 times; switch hands.

What triggers hand arthritis? ›

The exact cause of hand arthritis is unknown. The condition usually develops due to wear and tear of the joint, which occurs gradually over time. There's also a genetic component to hand OA. Family members may develop OA at a younger age than the general population, and may have more severe disease.

Is drinking more water good for arthritis? ›

Staying hydrated is vital when you live with arthritis. Hydration is key for flushing toxins out of your body, which can help fight inflammation, and well-hydrated cartilage reduces the rate of friction between bones, meaning you can move more easily.

What causes arthritis flare ups in hands? ›

The most common triggers of an OA flare are overdoing an activity or trauma to the joint. Other triggers can include bone spurs, stress, repetitive motions, cold weather, a change in barometric pressure, an infection or weight gain.

What painkiller is best for arthritis? ›

NSAIDs are the most effective oral medicines for OA. They include ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) naproxen (Aleve) and diclofenac (Voltaren, others). All work by blocking enzymes that cause pain and swelling.

Is turmeric good for arthritis in fingers? ›

Because turmeric (and curcumin extract) is safe and often effective in reducing osteoarthritis pain, it may be reasonable to try if deemed safe by your doctor. A hand surgeon can assist in offering treatment options and develop a comprehensive care approach with each patient with hand osteoarthritis.

Can overuse of hands cause arthritis? ›

Can overuse syndrome cause arthritis? There's no known link between this condition and arthritis, though overuse syndrome can lead to some other ailments, including: Tendinitis. De Quervain's tenosynovitis (irritation in the wrist and thumb tendons).

Is banana not good for arthritis? ›

Bananas and Plantains are high in magnesium and potassium that can increase bone density. Magnesium may also alleviate arthritis symptoms.

At what age does arthritis usually start? ›

It most commonly starts among people between the ages of 40 and 60. It's more common in women than men. There are drugs that can slow down an over-active immune system and therefore reduce the pain and swelling in joints.

What foods makes arthritis worse? ›

5 Arthritis Trigger Foods to Avoid
  • Pasta. Wheat products — like pasta, bread, crackers, and bagels — may spell trouble for your joints, especially if you have rheumatoid arthritis. ...
  • Butter and Margarine. ...
  • Hamburgers. ...
  • Tomatoes. ...
  • Sugary Drinks.
31 May 2018

Is Tiger Balm any good for arthritis? ›

Yes. In addition to treating muscle pain, Tiger Balm is helpful in relieving other types of pain, including back pain, joint pain, arthritis pain, and sprains.

What is the best painkiller for hand pain? ›

Simple analgesic medications such as acetaminophen (paracetamol) or aspirin are often useful in the relief of hand pain. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen, ketoprofen or naproxen can also be useful.

Are gloves good for arthritis? ›

Arthritis gloves are commonly prescribed, but there is little evidence to support their use. This research found that they are no more effective at reducing symptoms than looser-fitting gloves. It showed that arthritis patients found the warmth most comforting about using gloves.

What makes arthritis in fingers worse? ›

The pain is often worse after activities that require the use of the finger joints. For example, activities that require grasping or gripping an object may exacerbate it.

Is Squeezing a ball good for arthritis? ›

Ball exercises

They help increase flexibility and improve strength. Such exercises include: Full grip: Perform this exercise a couple of times each week, with a few days of rest in-between. Squeeze a stress ball in the hand as hard as possible.

Does massage help arthritis in hands? ›

Research conducted at the Touch Research Institutes at the University of Miami School of Medicine found that a combination of hand massage from a therapist and self–hand massage is likely to be effective in the easing of hand pain caused by arthritis and other conditions.

Can vitamin B12 help arthritis? ›

Vitamin B complex is a type of non-antioxidant vitamin. We don't fully understand how this type of vitamin may treat arthritis-related conditions, but evidence from trials suggests that vitamins B3, B9 and B12 might be of some benefit for treating osteoarthritis, particularly in improving joint mobility and hand grip.

What age does arthritis start in hands? ›

Osteoarthritis can affect anyone at any age, but it's more common in women over the age of 50. Some of the factors that can make you more likely to develop osteoarthritis in your hands include: being female. the genes you inherit.

What is good for arthritis in the hands and fingers? ›

Some medication options may help treat hand arthritis. For example, you can take oral pain-relieving medications. You can also get steroid injections in your joints or splint your hands to give them support. If these options don't work, surgery may help to reduce pain.

Is lemon water good for arthritis? ›

Lemon water may help reduce some symptoms of arthritis when consumed alongside your normal medicine routine. Promoting collagen synthesis and tendon repair. Aids in maintaining the immune system.

Is coffee good for arthritis? ›

Coffee could potentially benefit people with rheumatoid arthritis because of the anti-inflammatory properties of coffee. 4 Reducing inflammation in the body could help ease joint pain. Also, caffeine's stimulating effects help fight physical and mental fatigue that is common with rheumatoid arthritis.

Is Egg good for arthritis? ›

Eggs and inflammation

On the contrary, eggs have been shown to contain compounds that may have anti-inflammatory properties. For this reason, eating two eggs per week as a part of a well-balanced diet is recommended for most adults, including those with arthritis ( 9 ).

How do they test for arthritis in hands? ›

What imaging techniques may be used to diagnose arthritis?
  1. X-ray. X-rays may show joint changes and bone damage found in some types of arthritis. ...
  2. Ultrasound. Ultrasound uses sound waves (not radiation) to see the quality of synovial tissue, tendons, ligaments, and bones.
  3. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ...
  4. Arthroscopy.

How do you stop osteoarthritis from progressing? ›

Slowing Osteoarthritis Progression
  1. Maintain a Healthy Weight. Excess weight puts additional pressure on weight-bearing joints, such as the hips and knees. ...
  2. Control Blood Sugar. ...
  3. Get Physical. ...
  4. Protect Joints. ...
  5. Choose a Healthy Lifestyle.

Does arthritis make you tired? ›

Many people with arthritis say fatigue is one of their biggest challenges. Fatigue can be linked to many types of arthritis and related conditions. It's commonly a symptom of autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reactive arthritis and lupus.

What is better for arthritis heat or cold? ›

For an acute injury, such as a pulled muscle or injured tendon, the usual recommendation is to start by applying ice to reduce inflammation and dull pain. Once inflammation has gone down, heat can be used to ease stiffness. For a chronic pain condition, such as osteoarthritis, heat seems to work best.

Is CBD oil good for arthritis? ›

A: At a time when we are trying to reduce the use of pain relievers, CBD oil can be an effective approach to managing the pain of arthritis. Researchers have also recognized the role that CBD could play in reducing the pain-causing inflammation of arthritis. However, its effectiveness will vary from person to person.

What are the six main treatments for arthritis? ›

Reactive Arthritis: 6 Treatments to Consider
  • Antibiotics.
  • NSAIDs.
  • Steroids.
  • DMARDs.
  • TNF blockers.
  • Physical therapy.
  • Call your doctor.

Is ginger good for arthritis? ›

Ginger's beneficial properties

The anti-inflammatory properties seem to help relieve pain and improve joint function in people who have arthritis. Compounds in ginger may function as a COX-2 inhibitor, similar to how common arthritis medications work to relieve pain.

How much turmeric should I take for arthritis? ›

The Arthritis Foundation suggests taking turmeric capsules (400 to 600 mg) 3 times per day. Another option is to take a half to three grams of the root powder every day.

When should I take turmeric morning or night? ›

Most people find success taking turmeric either in the morning to start their day, or at night before bed to combat inflammation from the day's activities. We also recommend that you take turmeric with a meal since curcumin absorption increases when paired with healthy fats.

What do most doctors prescribe for arthritis? ›

Commonly used arthritis medications include:
  • NSAIDs . Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can relieve pain and reduce inflammation. ...
  • Counterirritants. ...
  • Steroids. ...
  • Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs).
15 Sept 2021

Is arthritis a disability? ›

Many people may wonder is arthritis a disability. Yes. Arthritis can prompt incapacity, as can numerous other mental and physical conditions. If your arthritis confines your daily movements, or activities you may qualify for disability benefits.

Is osteoarthritis in hands a disability? ›

Because of the severity of osteoarthritis the Social Security Administration (SSA) has determined that it is a disability, meaning you may be eligible to receive disability benefits. When submitting your SSDI application to the SSA your diagnosis and medical evidence should be in the SSA's Blue Book listing.

What fruit should you avoid if you have arthritis? ›

Citrus fruits cause inflammation

In fact, citrus fruits have anti-inflammatory benefits, as well as being rich in vitamin C and antioxidants. Grapefruit juice can, however, interact with some medicines that doctors use to treat arthritis.

Which fruit is good for arthritis? ›

Berries, apples and pomegranates

Berries are rich in antioxidants and the Arthritis Foundation notes that blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, cranberries, raspberries and boysenberries all provide arthritis-fighting power.

Is honey good for arthritis? ›

It has anti-inflammatory properties

Do you constantly experience joint pain, low energy, or poor digestion? These are signs of chronic inflammation. Luckily for you, honey is rich in antioxidants, which have been proven to help fight and prevent inflammation.

Does arthritis go away with exercise? ›

Exercise helps ease arthritis pain and stiffness

It increases strength and flexibility, reduces joint pain, and helps combat fatigue. Of course, when stiff and painful joints are already bogging you down, the thought of walking around the block or swimming a few laps might seem overwhelming.

How can you avoid getting arthritis? ›

How to reduce your risk of arthritis
  1. Stay at a healthy weight. Extra pounds put pressure on weight-bearing joints like hips and knees. ...
  2. Control your blood sugar. ...
  3. Exercise. ...
  4. Stretch. ...
  5. Avoid injury. ...
  6. Quit smoking. ...
  7. Eat fish twice a week. ...
  8. Get routine preventive care.

Is apple cider vinegar good for arthritis? ›

Some people believe that apple cider vinegar contains anti-inflammatory properties that would aid in the symptoms of arthritis, however, this has not been proven in humans. There is not enough evidence to show that apple cider vinegar is an effective treatment for any symptoms relating to arthritis.

Is milk good for arthritis? ›

Milk protects joints and bones. You might drink milk to strengthen your bones, but it could also do your joints some good. A study reported in the June issue of Arthritis Care & Research found that women who drank low-fat or skim milk experienced a slower progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA).

What triggers hand arthritis? ›

The exact cause of hand arthritis is unknown. The condition usually develops due to wear and tear of the joint, which occurs gradually over time. There's also a genetic component to hand OA. Family members may develop OA at a younger age than the general population, and may have more severe disease.

What are the first signs of arthritis in your hands? ›

Symptoms in the fingers
  • Pain. Pain is a common early symptom of arthritis in the hands and fingers. ...
  • Swelling. Joints may swell with overuse. ...
  • Warm to the touch. Swelling can also cause the joints to feel warm to the touch. ...
  • Stiffness. ...
  • Bending of the middle joint. ...
  • Numbness and tingling. ...
  • Bumps in the fingers. ...
  • Weakness.
17 Aug 2020

What causes arthritis flare ups in hands? ›

The most common triggers of an OA flare are overdoing an activity or trauma to the joint. Other triggers can include bone spurs, stress, repetitive motions, cold weather, a change in barometric pressure, an infection or weight gain.

At what age does arthritis usually start? ›

It most commonly starts among people between the ages of 40 and 60. It's more common in women than men. There are drugs that can slow down an over-active immune system and therefore reduce the pain and swelling in joints.

Can vitamin B12 help arthritis? ›

Vitamin B complex is a type of non-antioxidant vitamin. We don't fully understand how this type of vitamin may treat arthritis-related conditions, but evidence from trials suggests that vitamins B3, B9 and B12 might be of some benefit for treating osteoarthritis, particularly in improving joint mobility and hand grip.

What age does arthritis start in hands? ›

Osteoarthritis can affect anyone at any age, but it's more common in women over the age of 50. Some of the factors that can make you more likely to develop osteoarthritis in your hands include: being female. the genes you inherit.

What is good for arthritis in the hands and fingers? ›

Some medication options may help treat hand arthritis. For example, you can take oral pain-relieving medications. You can also get steroid injections in your joints or splint your hands to give them support. If these options don't work, surgery may help to reduce pain.

Is turmeric good for arthritis in fingers? ›

Because turmeric (and curcumin extract) is safe and often effective in reducing osteoarthritis pain, it may be reasonable to try if deemed safe by your doctor. A hand surgeon can assist in offering treatment options and develop a comprehensive care approach with each patient with hand osteoarthritis.

What painkiller is best for arthritis? ›

NSAIDs are the most effective oral medicines for OA. They include ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) naproxen (Aleve) and diclofenac (Voltaren, others). All work by blocking enzymes that cause pain and swelling.

Is there a test for arthritis in hands? ›

Blood, Fluid and Tissue Tests

Blood tests are not needed to diagnose all types of arthritis, but they help to confirm or exclude some forms of inflammatory arthritis. Your doctor may also draw joint fluid or do a skin or muscle biopsy to help diagnose certain forms of arthritis.

Do compression gloves help arthritis? ›

Compression gloves are commonly prescribed to arthritis patients in the NHS with the intent of easing pain, reducing swelling, and improving function of the hands. They are also sometimes worn while sleeping, with the aim to reduce hand stiffness in the mornings.

How do you stop osteoarthritis from progressing? ›

Slowing Osteoarthritis Progression
  1. Maintain a Healthy Weight. Excess weight puts additional pressure on weight-bearing joints, such as the hips and knees. ...
  2. Control Blood Sugar. ...
  3. Get Physical. ...
  4. Protect Joints. ...
  5. Choose a Healthy Lifestyle.

Does arthritis make you tired? ›

Many people with arthritis say fatigue is one of their biggest challenges. Fatigue can be linked to many types of arthritis and related conditions. It's commonly a symptom of autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reactive arthritis and lupus.

Does arthritis go away with exercise? ›

Exercise helps ease arthritis pain and stiffness

It increases strength and flexibility, reduces joint pain, and helps combat fatigue. Of course, when stiff and painful joints are already bogging you down, the thought of walking around the block or swimming a few laps might seem overwhelming.

Is arthritis a disability? ›

Many people may wonder is arthritis a disability. Yes. Arthritis can prompt incapacity, as can numerous other mental and physical conditions. If your arthritis confines your daily movements, or activities you may qualify for disability benefits.

Videos

1. Best Way To Stop Arthritis - Or At Least Slow It Down
(Talking With Docs)
2. Diet changes in patients who have inflammation and their hands | Dr. Brutus, Hand Surgeon
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3. Osteoarthritis Of The Fingers Heberden's Nodes - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
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4. Rheumatoid Arthritis of the hand - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
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5. How Do You Prevent Arthritis In Your Hands?
(Wendy Westwood)
6. Hand & Wrist Stretches for Arthritis Pain Relief - Ask Doctor Jo
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Name: Golda Nolan II

Birthday: 1998-05-14

Address: Suite 369 9754 Roberts Pines, West Benitaburgh, NM 69180-7958

Phone: +522993866487

Job: Sales Executive

Hobby: Worldbuilding, Shopping, Quilting, Cooking, Homebrewing, Leather crafting, Pet

Introduction: My name is Golda Nolan II, I am a thoughtful, clever, cute, jolly, brave, powerful, splendid person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.