Home » A Study in the Etymology of the Indian Place Name Missisquoi by George McAleer
A Study in the Etymology of the Indian Place Name Missisquoi George McAleer

A Study in the Etymology of the Indian Place Name Missisquoi

George McAleer

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230377926
Paperback
36 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...and the south branchMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...and the south branch comes in from Vermont. These join at Mansonville Station, in Potton, P. Q., and the bay on Lake Champlain, into which the river empties, also bears the name of Missisquoi. The representatives of the earliest families state that the wild ducks and wild geese were very abundant. The word has been spelled Missisco and Missiskoui. Do you not think that this latter derivation is at least a probable one? I have been able to obtain nothing further in connection with the word. I remain, dear sir, Faithfully yours, C. H. Gould, University Librarian. The Honorable The Provincial Treasurer, Quebec, P. Q. Smithsonian Institution. Bureau Of American Ethnology. Washington, D. C, April 15, 1905. Dear Sir: Your letter of April 13, making inquiries regarding the Indian term Missisquoi, is at hand. Without knowing the history of the term, it is impossible to give a full and satisfactory definition- but it is an Algonquin word, and, as it stands, would seem to be made up of the two elements, missi, great, large, much, and assisku, mud, soft clay. The first part of the word corresponds to the first syllables in our two words, Mississippi and Missouri. The second part corresponds more closely to the second part of the word Missouri, which signifies turbid- the second part of the word Missisquoi signifying, however, simply soft clay or mud. Very truly yours, W. H. Holmes, Chief. Mr. G. Alfred Morris, Treasurers Office, Quebec, Canada. Quebec, P. Q., April 18th, 1905. Dear Sir: I beg to acknowledge receipt of your esteemed favor of the 15th inst. giving me your definition of the Indian word Missisquoi, and to heartily thank you on behalf of the Hon. Mr. McCorkill for your courteous and prompt attention...